Friday, May 31, 2013

A New Alternative to Conventional Horse and Livestock Fencing

       
 


  This week I discovered a new type of fencing which is being sold primarily for horses and cattle.  This type of fencing promises to be less expensive and more durable than conventional plastic fencing, or the ribbon styled electric fence that is being seen more often in many places.  It also should require less maintenance and repair than conventional wood might, as some horses do something called cribbing, where a horse tends to chew and potentially destroy his fencing, stables, etc. while swallowing air.    This fencing is also very positive in terms of the environment.

        

             The owner places posts, wooden or I suppose some types of smooth metallic could be used, and then recycled relatively inexpensive rubber line can be interwoven, providing a sturdy reminder for larger horses.  This particular product is constructed from recycled stock car racing tires.  If it were not recycled in such a fashion, then it would be taking up space in a landfill somewhere.  This fencing is said to be strong and extremely durable.
             I also believe that if you used perhaps four instead of three strands as shown here, that this fencing could be used in grazing pastures for other types of animals.   Llamas, goats, miniature ponies, ostriches and perhaps even emu, and many other animals could have this type of fencing used in their grazing pastures.  I would probably select conventional fencing electrified or with barbed wire affixed to the exterior in places where you wish to protect livestock from wild animals outside the perimeter, particularly overnight.
            The seller of this type of fencing offers a ten year warranty on the product itself which does not apply to the installation itself.

              There is absolutely no maintenance required to the rubberized fencing, which makes it incredibly attractive for grazing areas to me.

              It's present price is:

1 INCH 70 FEET $.10 per foot plus shipping
2 INCH 30 FEET $.20 per foot plus shipping


www.rubberfencing.com




Rubber fencing can look quite good.





Farmowner has used wooden fencing for crucial areas and rubberized fencing in others.  This also offers some flexibility if you have not completed your thinking on design or if more animals are coming or being born.


                  This type of fencing has been used for forty years, and yet I had not seen it in my state.

This is made to weather windspeeds in excess of 200 mph.

   
Information on proper rubber fence installation:

 http://www.rubberfencing.com/directions-and-tools-needed-for-proper-installation.html

 

  Please go to the link above for pictures and additional information:



 These pictures and directions above are the work product and property of Jim Tonseth and his rubber fencing company.     I have included them for informational purposes.
I do not have any financial interest in Jim's company, I simply think this is a good idea for certain applications.

This fencing, even in Virginia's extreme heat, should last 20 years.

   This also has the benefit that your animals will not be injured by the fencing as can happen with wire fencings, and certainly with barbed wire types.

There are other companies that sell a similar product, but this one is the least expensive I have located.

This looks quite attractive when used in large areas.


Prior posts on animal and livestock fencing and related topics include:



http://rationalpreparedness.blogspot.com/2012/02/considering-varieties-of-fencing-for.html



http://rationalpreparedness.blogspot.com/2013/04/the-features-and-benefits-of-corral.html

http://rationalpreparedness.blogspot.com/2012/11/the-value-of-excellent-auger.html

http://rationalpreparedness.blogspot.com/2013/01/some-points-on-large-animal.html

http://rationalpreparedness.blogspot.com/2013/04/consider-wright-farm-gates.html

http://rationalpreparedness.blogspot.com/2012/04/gates.html



Update:  I spoke with Jim today and he relates that this rubberized material is made with both fiberglass and kevlar, as it had originally been used as stock car racing tires and had to be capable of enduring quite a bit of abuse.
             To answer Ian's question below, Jim is not aware that this type of fencing has ever been used in a place which endures 40 degrees below zero. He suspects that it would expand and contract under such conditions, but he does believe it would work.

     For those of you who would like to explore this furthur, Jim Tonseth's contact information is:

Questions or orders, please call:

Jim Tonseth        704-213-3382 (Cell)
                        704-637-7886 (Home)

Andy Hoyle        336-688-6761 (Cell)


Email Address    werecycletires@yahoo.com
           
 or                    jtahrubberfencing@yahoo.com





32 comments:

Matt said...

If the horses become spooked and charge the fence, especially at night, will they be able to see it in order to stop or jump if they're feeling the need, rather than run right through it? It's kind of narrow looking compared to the wooded traditional variety.

Dani said...

Oh, oh, oh, I like it - a lot. Recycling at it's best :) Thanks so much, now I have to see if I can find it here...

JaneofVirginia said...

I stall my horses overnight because we have so many predators and because so many things could happen which could fracture a leg while I am sleeping, so this would not be an issue for me. Most horses see better than you and I, so I think they would see these. Initially you could tie some fluorescent survey tape around the middles. I do that now for any new fence until animals become accustomed.
I like the fencing I have, but I can see how this might permit me to enclose an additional area for grazing for which perhaps I could not afford to enclose in regular wooden fencing.

JaneofVirginia said...

You would either find it there, or perhaps you could start a company and hire someone to make it for you, and sell it yourself.

Sandy said...

Now that is some great looking fence. This is something to really consider if you have animals or not. Recycling is a good thing!

Mamma Bear said...

I got the giggles when I imagined this fence up for my goat herd. When they go to make a head butt against the rubber strands would they bounce back a few feet and wonder what the heck happened?....bahahaha Maybe I should do one side of a pen for possible entertainment!

JaneofVirginia said...

The video to that could be hysterical. Mamma Bear, I hope this is a possibility ! LOL

JaneofVirginia said...

Sandy, I am wondering if I could put in fence posts, a standard gate, and use three or four strands of this fencing to keep deer out of my vegetable garden. I dislike wire, and this would certainly be cheaper.

Ian H said...

I haven't seen this in Canada, but will look for it. Not sure how it would handle -40C or F

Gorges Smythe said...

I can see how a determined animal might force its way through but, for most, it should be a very adequate and SAFE fence.

JaneofVirginia said...

Ian, That's an excellent question. I called the owner of the company, Jim today. He said that he is in North Carolina and that many people in his region have used this product, and that it also is made with kevlar and fiberglass as well as the special rubber which was originally used in stock car tires.
He does not have data for fencing in a setting of 40 degrees below zero F. He does expect there would be expansion and contraction, but he thinks it would work. He also adds that this is not the rubber fencing from the 70s which was rubber alone.
Thanks for a great comment.

JaneofVirginia said...

I think a determined animal might get through anything. The fact that kevlar and fiberglass line the middle of the rubber makes this stronger than a lot of other fencings. I would like to try this, and see how I think it would work best here.

Linda said...

I have no need for fencing of this type, but this is interesting. Race cars use so many sets of tires each race that this is a good reuse. You would have to put two fences to keep out deer or make the fence fifteen feet high. But, this fence would be cheap enough to do either.

BBC said...

Based on my experiences as a country boy in the west I'm not impressed with it unless the top wire is electric. Or at least barbed wire.

BBC said...

"I think a determined animal might get through anything."

Yup, I've never seen a fence that could stop me, hahahahaha

JaneofVirginia said...

When I finish some of the projects that are in process now, I would like to try this, if just around the vegetable garden, or around a grazing field some of the animals rotate to, in good weather.

JaneofVirginia said...

Yes, anywhere where predators are an issue, such a deterrent is necessary.

JaneofVirginia said...

I think tornado razor wire at the top of a tall fence would stop me rather effectively !

Karly Mittens said...

There are many things to keep in mind when installing your dog fence. First is how much freedom does your dog really need. Before laying out the fence wire you may want to take a walk around the house and look out the windows. If after you walk around and find blind spots, is this a area you want your dog to access?



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JaneofVirginia said...

Thanks for posting. I don't think that rubberized fencing is intended to be used for dogs. My point in this post is providing an alternative for livestock, miniature horses, and larger horses. It may also have some limited use for llamas and alpacas. Most dogs, mine included would make short work of a fence like this, pushing under or above the rubber lines, even though they are installed with tension.

BBC said...

It don't look anything like dog fencing to me, livestock fencing is best for a dog run. For Marie's horses I just used the standard old barbed wire, it works good and lasts a long time.

JaneofVirginia said...

I use wooden fencing for alpacas and for horses. (And corral panels in metal as a movable modular set up.) I use extra large barbed wire along forested property lines. It's tough to cut, deer jump right over it, and it is indeed a deterrent to trespassers. We check it every Spring and redo some if it needs it. The prior owners used to attach it to trees. We don't. We actually place fenceposts.

Farm Fencing said...

Hi,

Nice pictures, wood fence is more strong and durable. Ranch Fencing can also help you and give a long service to you, its no doubt. This is a really good read for me, Must admit that you are one of the best bloggers I ever saw. Thanks for posting this informative article.

JaneofVirginia said...

Thank you for taking the time to comment. As you know, the right fencing can be the difference between spending your time retrieving animals and repairing fences, or being more productive and giving care to the animals themselves. The right fence which looks good can be the difference between selling on the low side and selling for top dollar when it's time to sell a farm or other rural property.

Jannah Delfin said...

This is such a good post. Thank you for sharing this information. Keep it up!

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JaneofVirginia said...

Thank you Jannah, Fencing can be so important, certainly to animals, but many times to the utility of a home or structure, and very frequently to the value of such a property when it finally becomes time to sell. Fencing is often an investment which returns to the seller at sale time.

Azizul Haque said...

Wow! This is a very useful page and I really enjoyed reading article and all users’ comments. Recycling is one of the best ways for people to have a positive impact on the world. It has many benefits and make the world a much cleaner and greener place to live in. I think it should be a responsibility that everyone should take upon themselves.

JaneofVirginia said...

Thanks for your encouraging words. Recycling when done mindfully can also be a broadly cost effective way of doing many things. The old adage, "waste not, want not," is true.

BBC said...

Better the recycling is not making waste in the first place. But I do recycle more than most monkeys.

JaneofVirginia said...

I concede that selecting what you need rather then too many burdensome items is a good plan. Then, maintaining what you have to achieve its maximum useful lifespan makes sense. Reduce, reuse, and then recycle is a great plan. I have not quite gotten to the Canadian standard for recycling, but I am working on it. LOL

BBC said...

The old lady next door and I share one garbage can that gets picked up once a month and it is seldom full.

Deepak said...

Fences can be so important, certainly for the animal. Fencing is often an investment that returns to the seller at the time of sale.
horse care