Saturday, September 30, 2017

An Acoustic Attack in Cuba Causes and Evacuation


Photo:  Ars Technica

          According to the US State Department, in the last few months, 21 State Department Employees stationed in the US Embassy in Cuba, have suffered from headaches, hearing loss, cognitive issues, nausea, vomiting, balance issues, etc.  These have been classified as auditory attacks of some type, although the exact sourcing of such remains obscure. The situation was dire enough that half of our diplomats and embassy employees have been called home, leaving only a skeleton staff present while an investigation into this issue continues. Americans have been advised to leave Cuba and to come home.

                     Why would anyone in Cuba wish to send the US, a source of significant revenue, home? Why would anyone disrupt the new atmosphere of cooperation between Cuba and the US?   Why would such a problem occur close to the time that Cuba plans to retire Raul Castro?

                    Who, other than Russia, has done research on sonic weaponry ?   Who could Russia have sold such weapon to, and why ?

                     Our family once bought a mouse repellent for our rural home that plugged into an electrical outlet. It was said to work by producing a sound that mice did not like, but that humans could not hear. Four days of it left us with migraines, nausea, earaches, and general malaise until we threw it away, and then recovered.  The damage from acoustic weapons is not confined to the ears and has been implicated in cardiovascular disease as well.

                    This is a situation that bears watching.

Sunday, September 24, 2017

On Half Baked Commentaries



                If you read this blog frequently or even occasionally, you have probably noted that I haven't been reviewing or posting comments to the posts very often. Because I am ninety-thousand words into a fourth book a lot of my time is taken by the research and continuing work on that project, so I have not been as present as I once was on all of my blogs.  Secondly, and please believe me on this, only a few of the comments are worth approving for post.

                   Most of the comments commend the blog for providing full information on a subject of which they approve, and then they provide a link to their business, which is usually completely unrelated to the subject of the blog.  My post on the importance of durable dog houses in winter does not relate in any way to your sale of refrigerators in Mumbai. I don't think we have that many readers from India.
                    One post which gave very clear information on urinary tract infections and for strategies to avoid them, was accosted by a "spiritual doctor" who wrote a long comment.  May I suggest to you Sir, that if you spell vaginal as virginal, then you likely lack the education necessary in order to be providing medical advice, on my blog or anywhere else.      

                   Although I don't need anyone's political views to match mine, I certainly don't want people providing half baked, unsafe or irresponsible medical advice, particularly when I go to so much trouble to make sure that the information provided here, is as safe and as responsible as is possible.  Some time ago, the government of Iceland referenced this blog as a good place for general medical information for the public, and I would like to keep it that way.

                 So, if you wish to make a comment, then do so, but understand that if you are advertising a gentleman's club in Detroit that I am not going to be approving your comment to follow my post on strategies for safe emergency childbirth.

                     To those of you who are still commenting responsibly, I am sorry it takes me time to weed through the inane before approving your posts. I really do appreciate your readership and your commentaries.

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

A Review of OTC Meds for Your Kit


To recap the medications I believe you should have, unless of course you are allergic to any of the elements, are:   This is a review:

You need medications in suitable form (tablet, chewable or liquid) for each of the persons in your family of the following medications:  These medications are available " Over the Counter" (OTC) in the US and in Canada.

1.Acetaminophen   (aka tylenol)
2.Aspirin   (Give no aspirin to children without a specific physician's order, as aspirin products and other salicylates are implicated in something called Reye's Syndrome which is a devastating illness in children and those under 18.)
3.Loperamide (Imodium AD)  Available OTC in the US and in Canada.
4.Pepto-Bismol  (This is a salicylate, check with your pediatrician as to whether in an emergency, or when he/she is unreachable, whether they wish your child to have pepto-bismol, in view of Reye's potential)
5.Diphenhydramine  (aka Benadryl)   (Please have in capsular and in liquid form, and in chewable if you have children.
6.Iosat (for all family members)  One source is   I will discuss at length later and
there is detailed information on the site also.
7. Omeprazole     Try to get brown oval tablets rather than capsules because they can be cut in half as needed.
8. Loratadine (aka Claritin, or Alavert) tablets and rapidly dissolving variety also.
     (You may substitute Cetirizine should it be more effective for you.)
9. Ibuprofen 200mg. tablets, and liquid should you have children.  (Clear this drug in advance with your pediatrician)
10.Ipecac syrup
11. Simethicone liquid for children, and capsules or tablets for adults.

You may also wish to add Mucinex tablets.  These are glyceryl guaicolate in Canada, ask your pharmacist for guidance.

 Generic medicines for these supplies are just fine. Try to find meds with expiration dates marked on the package that are as far in the future as possible.  Wal-Mart, because they tend to move a lot of generic product, often has lots of medicines which have an expiration date farthest in the future.

Always keep 30 days ahead on prescription medications if you can, 90 days if you are able..

Of course, OTC and any drug is dangerous to children, and so these need to be packed away or in a locked cabinet that you, the adult can quickly access.
I will speak of these at length in the future.

Revisiting Potassium Iodide in Radiation Emergencies

   This is a post originally written by me, in 2011.   With Kim Jong Un experimenting with Hydrogen bombs, everyone should consider being in possession of Potassium Iodide, in order to help to protect our thyroid glands.   Please read below.



Potassium Iodide is a salt which when taken in the proper amounts, can block the uptake of radioactive iodine. It is frequently marketed in tablets, under the name of “Iosat”. Administering Iosat can be very beneficial because the thyroid can be quite vulnerable to radioactive iodine in a radiologic emergency, and because this strategy can benefit us in the prevention of later thyroid cancer. It is important to realize that even when properly used and taken as directed by public health officials, that the only organ protected by this practice is the thyroid, therefore evacuation from a contaminated area is always best. Since radioactive iodine has a half life of eight days, rational evacuation of a week or two may be all that is necessary. (Supposing that in this particular emergency, only radioactive iodine is released.) Following a radiologic emergency, a combination of administering potassium iodide tablets to human beings in the target area, coupled with evacuation, even for a week or two, is usually the best course.
Failure to take potassium iodide following a radiologic emergency may result in immediate or long term effects on the thyroid gland. Thyroid cancer, goiters, hypothyroidism, and thyroid growths may occur following untreated exposure to higher levels of radioactive iodine. Since thyroid failure in a child can impact intellect, and thyroid failure in a woman can impact successful reproduction, these are important considerations.
Many of us have chosen to keep an adequate supply of potassium iodide tablets for potential radiologic emergency in advance of such an occurence. This way, we sidestep distribution difficulties in a time in which our governmental and public health authorities will be most occupied. The tablets being sold now, most often have an expiration date of 2017. Those with small children, or with elderly family members may wish to consider buying the liquid preparation of this drug. The liquid version of this drug is said to expire in five years and is marketed as “Thyro-Shield”. In the past, I have purchased thyroid protective medication in advance of a radiologic emergency from the following sources: potassium iodide

potassium iodate
Please know that following the Japanese earthquake, tsunami, and subsequent nuclear reactor disasters in Japan, many sources of potassium iodide are temporarily unavailable, as they help to meet the need in Japan, not only for the Japanese people, but for first responders from other nations as they rush to help. Please rest assured that all sources here in America, will likely restock very quickly thereafter.
Both the dose required is noted on each package, as is the expiration date of each package. These medications should be kept in a cool, dry place. They may be effective beyond their expiration date, but I have replaced them as we approach expiration, in the years that we have kept these in our emergency supplies. I keep the expired tablets, in a plastic bag, marked EXPIRED, and I save them. I save them in the event that in an emergency they could be useful to someone, or in the event that an official veterinary body makes an official recommendation for animals, as at the present time, they have not. Iosat is approved by the FDA for this use and is stockpiled by many arms of the US government.
Potassium Iodate is also marketed for the purpose of blocking radioactive iodine uptake by the thyroid. (One of the brand names is Rad-Block) Presently, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) questions whether potassium iodate is as effective at blocking radioactive iodine uptake of the thyroid, as Potassium Iodide is. Therefore, Potassium Iodate is not approved by the FDA, but is in fact, available for sale at a variety of internet sources. The FDA also has voiced concerns regarding a higher potential for side effects from ingesting the Potassium Iodate preparation. Other nations may still stock and sell this in their pharmacies.
I think it is unquestionably wise for every family to invest the sum it would take to provide Potassium Iodide to their family members for a period of a few days, while planning to evacuate following a radiologic emergency. Although a “Dirty Bomb” is generally a local phenomenon, the potential for a nuclear bomb or even fallout from a local nuclear reactor, you may not even know existed in your area, is always possible. Although this does take some planning, reading and forethought, it is one of the easiest disaster preparations a family can make.
Although the news presently seems to indicate that the Japanese nuclear disaster will not adversely impact the contiguous United States, it is not over just yet. The Japanese still have six reactors in close proximity to one another, in tandem with spent nuclear fuel rods which are not yet being optimally cooled. This should be a lesson in the need for preparation for potential radiologic disaster for us all.

References and Sources for Additional Information: